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Articles of Interest, Books, YouTube on Delusional Disorder (DD)

 

To date, it seems that there are relatively very few large scale scientific studies and reports on Delusional Disorder (DD). This is because there are very few DD inpatients in the psychiatric hospital, only about 2-5%. But, the number of people with DD could be large in the world as seen in the Delusional Disorder Forum (http://www.psychforums.com:80/delusional-disorder/).

 

All the passages below are taken from the Delusional Disorder Forum and was initiated by bsc  from May 2004 to Feb 2013

 

Article Of Interest

by bsc » Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:56 pm

Old antipsychotic drugs comparable to new drugs, study finds 
By Rosie Mestel 
Los Angeles Times 

A landmark study comparing schizophrenia drugs has found that an older medication, perphenazine, is as effective at managing the devastating brain disorder as most of the newer, more-expensive drugs. 

The study also found that one newer drug, olanzapine, was modestly more effective than the other four medications in the trial but also carried the greatest risk for the side effects of obesity and metabolic disorders. 

The findings, announced yesterday, provide psychiatrists with their first head-to-head comparison of the antipsychotic medications, gathered over a reasonably long period of time, in real-life patient settings. 

But the trial also made it plain that medications for schizophrenia are far from ideal. 

By the end of the 18-month study, 74 percent of the patients had stopped taking the drug they had been assigned. Even in the most successful case of olanzapine, 64 percent of the patients had dropped the drug for another before the 18 months were up, the researchers reported in their study, to be published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. 

"Seventy-four percent is a breathtaking number," said Dr. Ken Duckworth, medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, a Washington-based patient-advocacy group. "We need to create better treatments and think more creatively about ways to support people in taking medicines that may help them." 

Schizophrenia is a poorly understood mental illness that affects an estimated 3.2 million Americans, causing them to experience hallucinations and paranoid delusions. 

Since the 1950s, a class of drugs known as antipsychotics has been used to treat these symptoms. The drugs act by blocking the action of a key brain protein known as the dopamine D2 receptor. 

However, this first wave of drugs, including perphenazine, caused troublesome side effects such as tremors, rigidity, muscle restlessness and involuntary limb movements. 

In the 1990s, a new group of so-called "atypical" antipsychotic drugs entered the market. The drugs were believed to have lower rates of body-movement side effects. 

Today, more than 90 percent of the antipsychotics prescribed to people with schizophrenia are atypicals, which are far more expensive. Olanzapine, for example, costs about $600 a month at higher doses, compared with $50 a month for perphenazine. Sales of antipsychotics in the United States total about $10 billion a year. 

Starting in 1999, the federally funded trial enrolled more than 1,400 adults at 57 sites around the country. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either the older drug perphenazine or one of four atypicals: olanzapine (brand name Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal) or ziprasidone (Geodon). 

At the dosages chosen, perphenazine was equally as effective as quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone, as defined by how long patients stayed on the drugs, the study found. 

Staying on drugs is a general measurement that factors in satisfaction of both patient and doctor about a drug's effectiveness and its side effects. It is especially significant for people with schizophrenia, who often think they don't need treatment. 

Surprisingly, movement disorders were no more apparent with perphenazine than with the atypical drugs. 

The findings may help doctors decide which drug to choose first for a patient, said Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, chairman of the department of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and principal investigator of the study. 

For instance, a patient whose symptoms are hard to control might be a good candidate for olanzapine, he said. Another patient whose symptoms are more manageable might be better suited to a drug with lower risk of obesity and blood lipid problems. Even though the new drugs are more costly, other expenses such as hospitalizations during relapses must be factored into the cost-benefit equation, the authors said. 

Patients receiving olanzapine experienced fewer such hospitalizations during the trial. 

The researchers said data from the trial would be used to examine the cost-effectiveness of the drugs and their effect on cognitive abilities and quality-of-life issues, such as the ability to work and live independently. 

Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company

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by bsc » Wed Sep 21, 2005 11:25 pm

I will reply myself. I read some other articles about this test report. It is amazing that three quarters of those on most of the drugs quit them. Very discouraging for those of us who are waiting for their DD relative/friend to say, OK I will take the meds. It is no panacea. There is little hope....

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            ----------------------------

 

2. Interesting new book

by bsc » Tue Apr 18, 2006 3:34 am

          Here is a link to Chapter 1 of a new book about laws pertaining to mental illness. I heard the author interviewed on NPR. 

http://www.peteearley.com/books/crazychapter.html

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by sisterfriend » Tue Apr 18, 2006 4:40 am

          Pretty much the truth. How are we going to ever get through this? We have children with them, meaning, this is for LIFE. I am so tired.

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by Goodwife » Tue Apr 18, 2006 3:39 pm

              This is becoming a habit. Crying while reading this forum. I read the chapter of the book, you put a link to, bsc, and promptly started crying. 

When my husband was having his surgery last month, I took the surgeon aside and told him that he is delusional and to be careful about his discussions with my husband during post-surgery visits. I was going to explain him not to go into details about surgery equipment (implanted devices for surveillance, you know), etc. He cut me short and said, "I read the medications he is taking. Don't worry." and walked away. I guess I had used up the 10 seconds he allocated to me. 

The condition of mental health treatment in the US is horrors. Most health insurance companies do not have it included in their plans or have so severe limitations that it is meaningless. And why should they? The only one who can afford these insurance policies are employers for their employees, and they certainly do not want to hire any mentally ill people. So it is a great system for both employers and health insurance companies. It also serves the Drs. well. This way, they know, they will be paid because only the rich ones can afford it.

Goodwife

 

 

by bsc » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:08 am

           I'm sorry. I don't want to make any of us cry. We sure have enough real things to cry about, don't we? 

Coincidence that my wife is having surgery on her leg in a few weeks. Her Dr (psych) told her she should not take her Lithium 2 days before thru 2 days after the surgery. I sure hope she doesn't find this to be the excuse to drop them altogether. I know she won't be feeling good. Hope she doesn't blame it on the meds.

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by Goodwife » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:36 pm

           I know bsc, I know. We just try to help each other. In fact, this is the only support group I have. I hope your wife's surgery goes well.

Goodwife

 

 

by me2 » Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:55 pm

          I borrowed this book from the library. I read it in only 2 days. I was sad and horrified that these types of things happen in real life. It is easy to see what happened to the author’s son being mirrored in how hard it is to get help for your own loved one. I found the book very interesting. I don't know if I would have found it so interesting without a family member suffering with a mental illness but you never know. 

Has anyone else read the book? If so what did you think of it?

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            --------------------------------------

 

3. CNN Larry King

by bsc » Sat Jun 23, 2007 4:58 am

         I watched Larry King tonight. He had what was supposedly a mental health show. One of the younger Kennedy politicians, and 2 comedians. Drugs and alcohol is their problem. Below is a copy of a feedback note I sent to CNN: 

On tonights (6/22/07) Larry King show a segment regarding mental health covered only drug and alcohol abuse. That is important, but you (he) left out a more important aspect of mental health, namely manic bipolar, delusional disorder, paranoia, schizophrenia, and a whole array of similar psychotic type illnesses, and how families are affected by these. 
The alcohol/drug issue involves not taking a substance. But the management of these other non-curable illnesses involves getting the patient to take medicines that he usually doesn't want to take. The nature of many of these illnesses is such that it wants to perpetuate itself, and causes the patient to reject these medicines. I think there needs to be more public focus and awareness of these issues. 
Giving public people who go off on a binge, a forum to get a pat on the back is not really addressing mental health.

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by seanetal » Sat Jun 23, 2007 8:20 am

             Great feedback to CNN and Mr. King. 

Larry King's show in the past has gone into great detail about mental health issues. While I agree covering the addiction segment is incredibly important, I would have liked to see at least passing mention of the rest of the mental health arena.

Sean Bennick
http://www.mental-health-matters.com


http://www.getmentalhelp.com


http://autismhelpathome.com/freeguide.htm

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            -------------------------------------------

 

4. Insurance Problems

by bsc » Thu Oct 25, 2007 10:13 pm

          Things have been going fairly well in my life with my wife. Her response to the meds has been pretty good, but, like we all know, it’s not a cure, just a mask. But I can live with that. 

Every 2 weeks we go down to the hospital for her ResperdalConsta shot. I don't go just to supervise, not necessary. She goes willingly, knowing it keeps things under control, and everybody happy with her. She has had in-depth talks with me, her parents, and brother (recently) about her mental experiences, and how hard it was to know reality from fiction, or even dreams. 

All that success being said, I just got an EOB from the mental health, insurance company rejecting all the claims for the cost of the shots. The hospital then followed up with the first bill, for the first shot of early July. They would normally pay 80% of these costs as they did with the hospital bill. 

They say these treatments were not pre-certified so they don't have to pay them. I assumed the Dr and the hospital would have taken care of that at the same time they filed claims for the hospital stay during my wife’s discharge, when they prescribe follow up treatment. Not so! 

You can't believe the cost the hospital is charging. I have heard the medicine itself is pretty pricey, and I think the hospital is doubling that, and adding a service charge for the nurse, and a room fee. Rip off! 

I certainly can't afford it. The 20% copay would be enough. I sent the insurance company a letter with a copy to the hosp billing, appealing their decision, with a number of reasons why she had to take that particular med that way, and how successful it has been, and ashamed to change it now, etc. 

Tomorrow morning she is scheduled for the next one. I hope they don't refuse her. That trauma would be a trigger for the next episode. 

Has anyone had problems with insurance??

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            -------------------------------------------

 

5. Abilify Commercials

by bsc » Mon May 19, 2008 10:11 pm

           Just noticed Abilify commercials on cable tv. My wife noticed first when the words Bipolar Disorder appeared. I usually put the tv on mute during commercials, but she wanted to hear it. 

No big deal. I just never saw anti-psych's advertised before on tv. There must be a new public awareness campaign by the pharma business. I guess that's a good thing.

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by Chucky » Mon May 19, 2008 11:22 pm

Hey, 
       That's interesting because there has never been an advertisement for a prescription-only drug here. I wonder what the exact aim of the advertisers is in this case? Do you they that patients will start recommending that their doctors prescribe them the drug or something? That's a bit counter-productive.

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by bsc » Tue May 20, 2008 4:40 pm

            The announcer seemed to aim mainly at bipolar mania. I cannot imagine anybody who truly needed an anti-psych saying, "hey that sounds like my problem, I'll talk to my Dr about it next week." 

My wife’s ears perked up until she heard the list of side effects in a low fast voice so you could barely understand. 

I told her that I have heard of it and it might work for her, but why change from something that is already working like her Resperdal.

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by qwerty » Tue May 20, 2008 5:25 pm

          did Risperdal cause your wife to gain weight? 
my wife is terrified of that.

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by Tara » Tue May 20, 2008 6:26 pm

Chucky, 
         you are in Ireland, right? As you note, advertising prescription medication is something virtually unheard of in Europe and it is quite a culture shock seeing everything from antifungal medication to psychotropic drugs advertised on TV and in other media. Apparently, people indeed ask their physicians for particular medication brand and while I would hope that no physician would blatantly prescribe something completely unnecessary just because his patient has seen the TV ad, in the situations where there are multiple treatment options advertising will probably pay off... 

bsc, 
      my thoughts exactly... Only segments of mentally ill population this ad will reach are either those who already have decent treatment (and therefore insight) so there is IMO no point in taking the risk of trying something else, or those who do not particularly need antipsychotic in the first place.

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by Chucky » Tue May 20, 2008 7:09 pm

         Yeh, I live in Ireland and - yeh - I'm actually very surprised on hearing that this sort of advertisement exists. No company would be allowed to do that here. The only place these drugs are 'advertised' is in medical journals. 
Kevin

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by peytonmanning18 » Tue May 20, 2008 9:23 pm

          The ads for prescription drugs on TV are relatively new in the US as well, I remember being surprised too when they started 10-15 years ago, now I don't bat an eye. 

I also wondered who they were aimed at, I think the pharmaceutical companies just hope to raise awareness among both doctors and laypeople, and maybe get people to ask their doctors about the drug. As has been discussed above however it is difficult to see how this would work with a drug like Abilify. 

I think it just goes to show you how much money is at stake that such a scattershot advertising approach can be considered a good option. 

Full disclosure: I work for a biopharmaceutical company, although not in advertising or sales.

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by Chucky » Tue May 20, 2008 11:26 pm

           If you're really Peyton Manning, then I'm the Pope... ...! Anyway, how exactly does the system work there regarding medication? I assume that ye get a prescription from ye're doctors and then go to a pharmacy like we do. However, do ye then have to pay for all of ye're medication? Here, I only have to pay 90 Euro (~$140) per month for my medication. After that, I pay nothing. 

Kevin.

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by Tara » Tue May 20, 2008 11:54 pm

Chucky, 
            as you may know, US does not have universal health insurance coverage provided by state/government whereas most European countries have some sort of state run universal health insurance systems in place. 

So, the way it works in US is that your physician gives you a prescription and you go to the pharmacy to get it. I guess that's about the only part that will still be familiar to you  

Who/how is that prescription going to be paid for depends on the type of insurance someone has. There are people with no insurance whatsoever who will have to pay the whole price of medication themselves. There are people with different types of private insurance or insurance paid by employer where insurance pays for medication (either the full amount or partial amount). Some people (elderly, disabled, low income) might qualify for state or federal run insurance and they will also get different medication benefits based on their status. 

So, in a nutshell, there is no rule and chaos rules  

If you go back and read some of posts on this forum, you'll find quite a few complaining about the state of US health system and insurance madness. For instance, bsc described enormous amount if trouble trying to get his insurance to pay for his wife's medication.

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by Chucky » Wed May 21, 2008 12:15 am

            Thank you - That's interesting. We actually hear a lot about the US health-care system here, and what we hear about it is usually all bad. I know people from here who have visited the US on a short-term working visa who got into trouble (medically-speaking) while over there. They were quite shocked with how they were treated and claimed that they wouldn't have been treated if they didn't have money. Here, that simply wouldn't happen. Even if you can't afford to pay for treatment, you will always get treated. 

I don't know... ...I guess ye're huge military budget takes a huge chunk of cash away from ye're basic living standards.

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by peytonmanning18 » Wed May 21, 2008 1:33 pm

Chucky wrote:...
          I don't know... ...I guess ye're huge military budget takes a huge chunk of cash away from ye're basic living standards.


I think this is probably an oversimplification. 

I have read articles critical of universal health systems that other countries like the UK and Canada have, the most common complaint being excessively long waits for needed procedures. I don't think there is a perfect solution. 

(Part of the resistance to universal health coverage in the US has to do with people's general dislike of Big Government.) 

Suffice it to say it is a complicated subject, and one that has been getting an enormous amount of public and private discussion in the US over at least the last 20 years. 

My guess is change is coming, if not from the federal level down then from the state level. Several states have implemented schemes to attempt to cover EVERYONE with at least basic health insurance. Also if a Democrat (Hillary Clinton or Obama) wins the next presidential election it is a good bet some kind of universal health coverage will become reality.

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by Chucky » Wed May 21, 2008 5:47 pm

            Well, people here complain about our health system, some even saying that it's worse than a Developing nation's system (it's not). The primary complaint here is - as you've mentioned - the long waiting lists. However, if you have insurance, you basically get examined/treated immediately. This isn't ideal, obviously. 

I've been watching the US election closely right from the start. Hillary seems to be promoting her health-system plans a lot - which is good - but it looks like Obama will now get the Democratic nomination in the next caucasus/primaries. 
Kevin

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by bsc » Wed May 21, 2008 10:05 pm

            Querty - yes she did gain weight. But she already had a tendency to be very overweight long before the mental problems became apparent. 

During the most intense manic time (about 2-3 years) she lost about 150 pounds in the first year. She kept it off because her metabolism rate was very high. The first time she was on Resperdal for 6 months, she started putting it back on. Then after the 7 months without it, she started to lose it again. The most recent period (about a year) she definitely put it all back on, plus some. 

I would rather have her fat and sane. For some reason, in the past 2 years, I put on about 50 pounds. So now we are a match. 

In regard to health care costs, I still haven't been officially billed for the now $14,000 accumulated for the Resp shots. And the insurance company is still not paying. 

In regard to health insurance, whether private insurance or gov coverage, I think the biggest problem in the USA (affecting us) is the mental health discrimination compared to "physical" health. Now that it is becoming understood that most mental health problems are indeed physical, chemical, biological, they should be treated like diabetes, cancer, heart, skin, etc. How is that overseas?

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by Chucky » Wed May 21, 2008 11:41 pm

         Mental health here is severely underfunded and the infrastructure for it is lacking. There was a case recently, actually, where an Anorexic girl could only get adequate treatment by going across to England. The government is releasing advertisements about mental health though. We have a big suicide problem here - at one point a few years ago, we had the highest suicide rate in the world. 
Kevin

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            -------------------------------

6. New Insurance Rules????

by bsc » Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:11 pm

           Has anyone heard or read of the effects of the mental health insurance changes that went thru with the 700 billion bailout package??? 

It is supposed to put mental health at parity with physical health, in regards to insurance coverage - but what does that mean in practice??

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by peytonmanning18 » Fri Oct 17, 2008 8:51 pm

bsc, 
       I hadn't heard this yet. Doing a search at http://news.google.com/ on "mental health parity" +bill brings up a lot of recent articles, two I have skimmed are here:http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/43/20/1 

and here: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Story?id=5985943&page=1 

It looks like there should be changes as a result of this, although how quickly they happen remain to be seen.

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            ---------------------------------------------

 

7. Interesting Article

by bsc » Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:30 pm

            This may have little to do with DD, but it may interesting reading for those with an interest in domestic violence and abuse. 

It is pretty long in 4 sections: 

http://money.cnn.com/2008/11/18/news/Do ... 2008112011

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by Tara » Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:59 pm

bsc, 
         thanks for the article. I was thinking about similar things for a long time. While my own situation doesn't qualify as garden variety domestic violence, some aspects still apply - using workplace as sanctuary, impact of domestic situation on professional life, tendency to avoid discussing personal life with co-workers - those are all very familiar to me. 

I remember one occasion when I had to come to the office on the weekend - my husband had some grumblings but did not go into full scale delusions over it. It still crossed my mind that he could have had a fit about it and I couldn't have any reasonable way to explain why it is a big deal to come to the office. Someone else, with DD jealousy subtype spouse for instance, could literally get killed over something like that. The thing is, I would not even think about this sort of thing before my husband's illness and most people don't consider situations related to mental illness or domestic violence until they get personally touched by it. 

Sunny - I guess the guy mentioned in the article might have had something "diagnosable", like DD jealously subtype but in my opinion it would be a cop out to claim that each and every perpetrator of domestic violence is mentally ill as defined by DSM-IV...

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            ------------------------------------

8. Othellos Syndrome

by bsc » Mon Jan 19, 2009 1:46 am

             Someone mentioned it - sure describes much of what goes on arround here. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delusional_jealousy

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by Chucky » Mon Jan 19, 2009 11:56 pm

            In many cases, however, there is usually evidence to suggest that the respected partner has been unfaithful. That's interesting all the same though - Othello's Syndrome - neat.

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by faithful » Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:16 am

Chucky, 
          Where did you get, "there is usually evidence to suggest that the respected partner has been unfaithful."? 

Huh? No there isn't. People with DDJ make up "evidence" out of thin air, and refuse to look at any actual evidence to the contrary. Re-read my posts and every other accused spouse in this forum. I am utterly astounded you can make such a statement.

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Who's unfaithful?

by dga18344 » Tue Jan 20, 2009 2:37 am

         In my case, my DDJ husband was the only one who was unfaithful. He told me in one case (there may have been others) because he thought he may have contracted AIDS and was worried about passing it on to our kids. (Don't ask about the logic!) I had to be supportive as he was really worried about his condition. (He was OK actually.)

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by Chucky » Tue Jan 20, 2009 11:14 pm

faithful wrote: Chucky, 
           Where did you get, "there is usually evidence to suggest that the respected partner has been unfaithful."? 

Huh? No there isn't. People with DDJ make up "evidence" out of thin air, and refuse to look at any actual evidence to the contrary. Re-read my posts and every other accused spouse in this forum. I am utterly astounded you can make such a statement.


Hi faithful, 

I understand your knee-jerk reaction to my post because, to be honest, I didn't explain it as I would have wanted to. I do mean what I said in my post, but I forgot to add that this 'evidence' is usually non-existent. The only place that it exists is in the person's head. So, my apologies for the confusion. Having read my post again just now, I would be equally as disgusted with me as you were/are. 

Take care, 
Kevin

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by metal mark » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:29 am

My wife does not have a shred of evidence. 
She has examined ...Bank statements 
...House phone records 
...Credit cards statements 
...Mobile phone records 

She has interogated...Me 
...My family members 
...Her family members 
...Family freinds 
...Complete strangers out of the phone book 
I could go on and on but the important thing is that she found absolutely nothing...... 

So she makes it all up.....She smells thing that are not there 
.....She hears conversations in toilets 
.....She sees me with women 
....She repeats conversations she did not hear and did not take place. 

She relates all this to my family and friends and also a councilor I finally got her to see twice. 
Her stories are so irrational and unreasonable that no one believes her.

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by faithful » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:37 am

         me too. You are not alone.

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by metal mark » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:57 am

       Thank you Faithful for your words. 

The last three nights have been wonderful as she has not phoned me at work to check where I am. However she will be sat up waiting for me to get home, just to check I arrive home on time. 

Each time I get over one hurdle (with the help of my councilor) she finds a new one to shove in front of me. Things are a lot better than they have been over the past three years but the underlying problem is still there. She seems to think I only need 10 minutes with a woman in order to have had an affair. A few weeks ago she accused me of having an affair with her cousin who I met once for ten minutes, thirty years ago. 
All I want to do is live the remaining years of my life quietly with my lovely wife, doesn’t look like it will happen. Why did I agree to "in sickness and in health". 

Ha Ho

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by Bri » Wed Jan 21, 2009 7:21 am

MetalMark: 
            My list is just as long as yours (and more) and he's never found anything either. I was just discussing with a friend today two of the things you mentioned in your post. Regarding smells and false memories. 

Smells: 
           I learned delusions extend beyond sight and sound to smell and touch as well (as it relates to the delusion that is). I always thought delusions were limited to "seeing and hearing" things that are not real. It never dawned on me the delusions would include smell/touch. But it makes sense if you think about it. Whatever part of the brain is malfunctioning, misreading signals, it would not stop with sight and sound. It would affect the WHOLE arena of signal intake and interpretation (or MIS-interpretation) by the brain. My DDJ not only sees and hears men outside the window who are not there, but he SMELLS men he claims have been in the house. 

False Memory: 
              I also learned delusional people have what is called Pseudo-Memory. They remember things falsly or things that NEVER happened. I can't tell you how many times my DDJ recalled an event and absolutely changed it. Even events that only happened 10 minutes ago. It's very strange, however, I noticed the false memory SERVES to make his theory true. Most people deduce a theory based on available evidence, while the DDJ decides on a theory first and THEN tries to build the evidence AROUND it. It's like they try to build a foundation with straw and grass because they don't have stones and bricks. Does that make sense? 

Anyway, I know you're frustrated. Everybody here is. I am completely exhausted and there is no end in sight. This board is the only support I have. Keep posting....it will make you feel better.

Bri

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by qwerty » Wed Jan 21, 2009 6:37 pm

            It's just my humble opinion from observing my wife, but preventing these false memories is a real key to any future treatment/medications that could be used to treat DD. 
I know others have mentioned this -- that their "proof" is not uusually brought up by the DD patient when the event happens, but is brought up several months down the road when they "remember" it. 
My wife is doing better now, but during the depths, she would be awake, but seemed to be almost dreaming, with eyes darting and blinking. It reminded me of R.E.M. sleep. It was like the 'wiring' in the brain that keeps the dream part of the brain separated from the reality part no longer worked correctly, and thoughts, fears, dreams, memories are getting all crossed up. 

Of course, even if there was a medicine that worked and the illness was completely understood, there's still the problem of getting them to see a doctor. I don't suppose that will ever change.

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9. Genetics

by bsc » Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:46 pm

          Many times in the past few years I have mentioned the fact that both my daughters also have mental problems. Of course they were passed on by my wife. The younger one (32) will not own up to it, and rejects any notion that she should be on meds. The older one (34) knows she has problems and has been seeing a psych and taking meds for some years. 

We were surprised to get a call from my MIL Sunday before last that the older daughter is in the psych ward. She apparently admitted herself several days before. She being the mother of our grandchildren, we were very concerned. I called her husband, our SIL, and he confirmed it. She didn't want anyone in the family to know, but it leaked out. We went to see her during visiting hours that night. She was a mess. They have her on anti-depressant and anti-psychotics. 

They discharged her last Wed for a total stay of 7 days. We visited her and the grandkids yesterday. She seems much better than when she was in the hosp. She is a little touchy and we have to walk on eggshells to have a conversation with her. 

I only post this to the board to reiterate the high probability of offspring also developing these mental illnesses genetically. 

Faithful has also related problems with her son, who takes after his father. Like her son, my daughter has also had some negative feelings towards her children, when she is not on her meds. That's why she says she knows how important they are. We are grateful for that. Her husband does worry though, as do we.

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by dbx » Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:59 pm

          yeah, genetics may be responsible for some mental illnesses though currently there's no reliable link established. There are only hints and bits about this and they don't really know which genes are actually responsible for such things.

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by Bri » Wed Mar 04, 2009 5:29 pm

           I don't understand "how" there is no established genetic link? There was an article recently posted here about Dopamine levels that detailed how low level dopamine can cause ADD/ADHD, Parkinson's, and something else, while high levels cause paranoia and delusions. Well, my DDJ's paternal gr'mother had Parkinson's, his father, he, and 2 of his brothers have paranoia and delusions, and with his sister's children, one has ADD and the other ADHD. It seems CLEAR to me that there is a genetic flaw in regard to Dopamine being passed through this family. How is it they have found no genetic link? It's SO obvious!

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by dbx » Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:10 pm

Bri wrote: I don't understand "how" there is no established genetic link? There was an article recently posted here about Dopamine levels that detailed how low level dopamine can cause ADD/ADHD, Parkinson's, and something else, while high levels cause paranoia and delusions. Well, my DDJ's paternal gr'mother had Parkinson's, his father, he, and 2 of his brothers have paranoia and delusions, and with his sister's children, one has ADD and the other ADHD. It seems CLEAR to me that there is a genetic flaw in regard to Dopamine being passed through this family. How is it they have found no genetic link? It's SO obvious!



There's much more research needed on such things. There are clear links that genetics plays a role but those links do not show which genes actually cause mental problems. I suspect it's not just one or two genes responsible, but a multitude of them interacting together

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by bsc » Wed Mar 04, 2009 11:08 pm

           I think what dbx is saying is that there has been little "formal" research done in this area to say officially that a link has been found, and that genetics definitely plays a roll. 

But dbx, regardless, we know what we see. There certainly is a tendency for next generations to have the mental problems of their forbearers. I simply said there is a "high probability" that this will occur. I am sure there will be many times when it doesn't. 

It's like the 30% chance of rain. They can forecast that conditions will be right for rain. But there is no guarantee it will or won't. And there can be surprise showers where none was expected. 

When a parent has mental illness, watch out for a rainy day on the children and grandchildren.

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by chloe09 » Wed Mar 04, 2009 11:51 pm

          I think there's definitely a genetic link of some kind with MI. 2 of my cousins from the same family have schizophrenia (one of which committed suicide), quite a few have depression, there's also dementia. My paternal grandfather committed suicide so clearly he wasn't well either. Surely that proves there's a genetic link? 

Also, when I spoke to the mental health team the other day about my partner, they asked if there was anyone else in his family that have a MI, they also asked if he'd ever witnessed a psychotic episode?

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by Tara » Wed Mar 04, 2009 11:51 pm

            In the case of parent's mental illness, there is also the additional burden of the environment - so, not only do you inherit the genes that make you susceptible, but you are also likely to grow up with mentally ill parent. So, it is double whammy... 

There is definitely much to be done when it comes to psychosis research. Genetics and epigenetics of psychosis are obviously far from trivial, and to make things worse this is one area where willing research subjects will be few and far between...

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by Bri » Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:23 pm

dbx and bsc: 
            Oh, I wasn't questioning the validity of dbx' post. I was just griping about the medical field saying they have no "reliable link"! I can tell them there's a link and I don't even have a medical degree! HA! 

Tara: 
I believe you are SO RIGHT! I was just talking to my DDJ's sister the other night and she was telling me about the violent abuse her father displayed in the home when they were kids. The father not only had delusions, but he was abusive too. My DDJ got the delusional gene from his father and then his environment created the high level stress that often leads to a chemical imbalance. Double whammy.....

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by chloe09 » Fri Mar 06, 2009 4:54 am

            I believe you are SO RIGHT! I was just talking to my DDJ's sister the other night and she was telling me about the violent abuse her father displayed in the home when they were kids. The father not only had delusions, but he was abusive too. My DDJ got the delusional gene from his father and then his environment created the high level stress that often leads to a chemical imbalance. Double whammy.....



OMG!! My mans Dad was also abusive and I believe delusional (from what I've heard and seen) .... this is all starting to add up now .... hmmmmmm

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10.  Mental Illness movie

by bsc » Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:17 am

            My wife discovered a 1993-4 movie (Mr Jones) with Richard Gere about a man who is bipolar. She ordered it from Amazon and insisted she wanted to see it. It may not necessarily apply to all the situations on this DD board, but an interesting mental illness movie never-the-less. Maybe this is old news, but we never heard of it before.

bsc

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Re: Mental Illness movie

by coldhands » Sun Jul 12, 2009 9:33 pm

             I haven’t seen it. Bi-Polar seems to be a popular mental illness to depict especially in soap operas. Guess a character with bi-polar adds more drama and entertainment value than any other mental illness.

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Re: Discussing DD with Wife?

by leavingthedarkness » Fri Nov 20, 2009 5:16 am

Hi MrSicily,
         I did a little digging, here is a list of topics in the DD forum that you might find helpful or interesting. 

delusional-disorder/topic36573.html
LEAP - Listen Empathise Agree Partner

delusional-disorder/topic36555-10.html 
Delusional Disorder (DD) - Making Sense of It

delusional-disorder/topic36236.html
Walking on eggshells

delusional-disorder/topic32025.html
How to respond to a delusion?

Hope this helps.

leavingthedarkness

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